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A Wrinkle in Time

The film director of Disney’s A Wrinkle in Time, Ava DuVernay opened her production with a personal message to the film audience. She thanks the audience for coming to the film, and encourages everyone while viewing the film to find their inner child where imagination can run wild. She encourages each individual to draw upon their own experience of the told story and dare to be childlike while viewing the film. Children embrace a simple faith to take a journey in order to experience an adventure. From book to screen, DuVernay’s vision is that Madeleine L’Engle‘s timeless classic, “A Wrinkle in Time” will speak to each film goer in a fresh new way examining the nature of darkness vs. light and good vs. evil.

An epic adventure based on Madeleine L’Engle’s timeless classic, “A Wrinkle in Time” is the latest Disney feature film under the same title, directed by filmmaker, Ava DuVernay. DuVernay gleefully introduces film audiences to Madeleine’s imaginative world that span dimensions using  space and time. Creatively comprised of Madeleine’s use of words and languages one is drawn into a surprise discovery of a story of ‘the power of love.’

Madeleine’s young adult novel was published in 1962 and became an instant classic. The story of a young girl searching the universe for her father endeared countless of readers around the world. Her writings birthed four additional books and together known as L’Engle’s Time Quintet. The Newbery Medal was awarded Madeleine’s quintet in 1963.

Celebrated screenwriter Jennifer Lee was asked to adapt L’Engle’s novel to the big screen and was delighted to be considered for the job. “As a child, the book defied anything I had read at that point in my life in terms of imagination,” says Lee.  “And, it was my first introduction to a character like Meg (dynamic, flawed and unique), who goes through an extraordinary adventure and comes out stronger as a person.”

Charlotte Jones Voiklis, Madeleine L’Engle’s granddaughter, found DuVaney to be an exciting choice to direct. “She represents so many firsts, as did my grandmother, and the two mirror each other beautifully.” She adds, “One of the things my grandmother would always say is that we can’t pretend evil doesn’t exist.” Continuing, “We need to give children the tools with which to fight it.” Voiklis feels that DuVernay understands that well, and goes about it (directing the film) with a great clarity of vision and empathy.”

DuVernay’s journey to making this film would be a challenging one: to capture the emotional story of a young girl with relationship to her family; and, hold onto L’Engle’s details that countless readers hold dear. “Certain aspects of the story have been updated or tweaked for the cinema.” She noted that it was her job to super-size memories of those book lovers who remember reading it for the first time and then make it so to expand their imagination. DuVernay adds, “Our goal was to capture Madeleine L’Engle’s intention with the story.” She continues, “The reason why generations of people have gravitated toward the book is because it has an edge,” Adding, “It was on the edge of imagination in 1962, and our goal was to extend that edge through our design and effects to bring Jennifer Lee’s script to vibrant life.”

SYNOPSIS:

Meg Murry (Storm Reid) is the daughter of two world famous physicists. Meg is intelligent and uniquely gifted but doesn’t want to understand those two points because her struggle for self-worth as a middle school student absorbs her world. Meg has a younger brother, Charles Wallace (Deric McCabe). He is equally intelligent and uniquely gifted but unlike Meg, he has an overwhelming positive attitude for a kid and a genuine love for humanity, as well as, for adventure.

Meg and Charles Wallce’s father, Mr. Murry (Chris Pine) went missing four years ago. Meg is lost without him and her mother is trying to cope with his absence. Charles Wallace, too young to remember his dad only basks in his legacy. Meg feels he is alive but as time passes her hope of his return dwindles.

Back in the day, Mr. and Mrs. Murry were working diligently on a a project to track events in the cosmos. Mrs. Murry (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) was the detailed physicist, while her husband, Mr. Murry was the big-picture guy. When Charles Wallace was a toddler, Mr. Murry discovered tessering, a wrinkle in time and space through which intergalactic travel is possible. An unproven theory drawing skeptics from the scientific community, Mr. Murry was ready to embrace his finding and prove it. No one dared to dream possible his disappearance would have a connection.

Charles Wallace, Meg and a fellow classmate Calvin (Levi Miller) are hanging out when three strange female visitors from another world appear, Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon), Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling) and Mrs. Which (Oprah Winfrey). Already been introduced, Charles Wallace shares the their story with Meg and Calvin. He tells them they have come to bring Meg a message that her father is alive but is in grave danger. A darkness has invaded the universe and her father is close to be captured by the darkness. The darkness wants Mr. Murry’s expertise to fight against the good. If Meg is willing to journey with the three-Mrs.-Visitors their help will be a guide of light to find her father and the hope for a rescue. To bring him home.

A simple task. Meg will do anything to bring her father home. But, Meg’s journey isn’t so easy. She must look to her own self first and battle the flaws that keep her from embracing the light. As Meg listens and learns from the three wise visitors, she understands where the strength to overcome the darkness has its origin.

24/7 MOMS film journalist, Karen Pecota

Rated: PG

Release date is March 9, 2018

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