Ressurection Recipes – Buns and Cookies


Today is the last day of our Everything Easter Egg-stravaganza. We have shared a lot of fun Easter ideas to help simplify your Easter celebrations from Recipes , Traditions, egg hunt ideas to what to put inside those plastic eggs. If you did not get a chance to check in daily be sure to scroll down and catch up on all the helpful Easter ideas and enter to WIN one of the daily giveaways, we will be choosing the winners on Monday April 13th, 2009.

Today we have two simple ideas to use in sharing the Easter story with your children along with another fun kid friendly giveaway.

Recipes to Explain the Easter Story
By Nancy Peterson

Bunnies, baskets, and eggs, Oh my…
Want to explain Easter to your children in a creative way? Nothing against the Easter Bunny, but I want my kids to understand the true meaning of Easter. My sister uses a cookie recipe to explain what happened during the death and resurrection of Jesus. Even though I loved her tradition, my kids were too little to grasp the whole concept of dying on the cross. So I focus mainly on Sunday morning when the tomb was empty. The following is the recipe I use to explain what took place Easter morning. We insert a marshmallow, “close” the tomb (dough) and after it bakes the bun is empty/hollow just like the tomb. It gets the meaning across in a fun and yummy way. My sister’s recipe is a bit more detailed, but her kids look forward to making them every year. Whatever you chose, make a meaningful memory that your children will enjoy. Happy Easter!!

RESURRECTION BUNS (my tradition)


1 package Rhodes frozen Rolls
24 large marshmallows
¼ cup (1/2 stick) melted butter or margarine
½ cup sugar mixed with ½ teaspoon cinnamon

Thaw 24 rolls. Flatten each roll to about 3” in diameter. Place a large marshmallow in the center of the dough and pinch dough together to seal the marshmallow inside. Roll between the palms of your hands into the size of golf ball. Dip in the melted butter, then roll in the cinnamon-sugar and place on a lightly greased cookie sheet spaced apart evenly. Let rise until double in size (30-60 minutes). Bake at 350 degrees F for 15-20 minutes, until golden brown. Remove from the cookie sheet and cool on a wire rack.

The marshmallow will disappear just like the tomb Jesus was placed in. It’s empty and He’s alive.

RESURRECTION COOKIES (my sister’s tradition)

Read the whole recipe before beginning…try to do together Saturday night before Easter Sunday.

Preheat oven to 300 degrees.

Ingredients: You need:
1 cup whole pecans Mixing bowl
3 egg whites Wooden spoon
1 cup sugar Bible
1 tsp. vinegar Zipper baggie
1 pinch of salt Waxed paper
Cookie sheet
Tape

Place pecans in zipper baggie and let children beat them with the wooden spoon to break into small pieces. Explain that after Jesus was arrested, He was beaten by the Roman soldiers. Read John 19:1-3

Let child smell the vinegar. Put 1 tsp. into mixing bowl. Explain that when Jesus was thirsty on the cross, He was given vinegar to drink. Read John 19:28-30

Add egg whites to the vinegar. Eggs represent life. Explain that Jesus gave His life to give us life. Read John 10:10-11

Sprinkle a little salt into each child’s hand. Let them taste it and brush the rest into the bowl. Explain that this represents the salty tears shed by Jesus’ followers, and the bitterness of our own sin. Read Luke 23:27

So far, the ingredients are not very appetizing. Add 1 cup sugar. Explain that the sweetest part of the story is that Jesus died because He loves us. He wants us to know and belong to Him. Read Psalm 34:8 and John 3:16

Beat with a mixer on high speed for 11-15 minutes until stiff peaks are formed. Explain that the color white represents the purity in God’s eyes of those whose sins have been cleansed by Jesus. Read Isaiah 1:18 and John 3:1-3

Fold in broken nuts. Drop by tsp. onto waxed paper-covered cookie sheet. Explain that each mound represents the rocky tomb where Jesus’ body was laid. Read Matthew 27:65-66

Put cookie sheet in the oven. Close the door and turn the oven OFF. Give each child a piece of tape and seal the oven door. Explain that Jesus’ tomb was sealed. Read Matthew 27:65:66
GO TO BED

Explain that they may feel sad to leave the cookies in the oven overnight. Jesus’ followers were in despair when the tomb was sealed. Read John 16:20 and 22

On Resurrection Morning, open the oven and give everyone a cookie! Notice the cracked surface and take a bite. The cookies are hollow! On the first Resurrection Day, Jesus’ followers were amazed to find the tomb open and empty. Read Matthew 28:1-9

HE HAS RISEN!! HALLELUJAH!!

Today’s Egg-stravaganza Giveaway:

I admit I am a Clean freak mom who has to be reminded that children need to have the opportunity to create, make art messes and enjoy tactile learning so when I discovered this new art activity called Powder Art I was one happy mommy. No more spilled water messes with this project.

Powder Art is the NEW innovative peel and paint art activity uses revolutionary dry paint powder made of recycled paper, instead of paint. Kids need little assistance to complete the art project due to the user-friendly paint palette tray of colors and design boards with peel off stickers. With easy-to-use paint-by-number designs, Powder Art allows kids to choose to follow the color guide or they can explore their creativity by either designating
different colors for their design or mixing colors together for a customized picture.

Not only is Powder Art a fun, easy art project for kids, moms appreciate that it mess-free and simple. With each kit containing all the materials for a complete art activity, set up and clean up is painless. Unlike other paint activities, Powder Art does not
involve water, or paint that leave stains or dye clothes. Powder Art is an undemanding way for parents to entertain kids in individual or group at-home activities or birthday parties and social outings.

As an educational art project, Powder Art provides moms with a great alternative to mind-numbing computer and video games. According to a 2006 study published in the American School Board Journal, art activities stimulate children’s brain function and build reasoning skills, visualization and fine motor skills critical for development.

We loved that Powder Art is available in six designs appealing to both boys and girls including Sports, Jungle Animals, Planes & Trains, Puppies & Kittens, Bible Stories and Magical Moments. Each kit features four design boards, eight Powder Art colors, a paintbrush, an artist palette tray and a color guide instruction sheet. The suggested retail price per kit is approximately $8.99, making Powder Art a great value at around two dollars per art activity. Powder Art is available at select specialty retail locations and PowderArt.com.

Nate our youngest is our Art creator and he will be creating wonderful Powder Art creations with his 24/7 MOMS approved Art Project Powder Art.

24/7 MOMS and Powder Art are giving away Powder Art kits to TWO winners. To enter for your chance to win, enter your name and email address in the box below you will be signed up for today’s giveaway as well as be added to the 24/7 MOMS E-list (if you are not already a 24/7 MOMS subscriber).

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3 Responses

  1. THANK YOU for all the wonderful Easter recipes, art projects, giveaways, and especially all the hard work you put into everything. I had lots of fun. I'm going to make your Resurrection Rolls & your sister's Resurrection Cookies – what great ideas to explain Easter to children! Also, I received the 1-2-3 Organize Child's Room Book and Affresh on Wed. Thanks again. HAPPY EASTER TO YOU & YOURS and TO YOUR READERS!
    vinter@warwick.net

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